A Letter to my Character

ImagePhoto Credit: Letters to Humanity

Okay guys, did you happen to catch the letter I posted last Monday that was sent to me from my protagonist? If not, you can quickly view that post here. Anyway, this is the follow up letter that I’m sending him with my responses to some of the concerns he raised in his initial correspondence. Take a look.

Andrew,

Yes, you can call me JohnRaymond if you like, but I’d much prefer that you call me John. Or even Mr. Guillen. After all, I did create you. I don’t see anything wrong with a little respect between the two of us. I’ll call you Andrew or Banks or whatever you like, let me know in any future correspondence.

The first point you raised in your letter is that you don’t see us being the same person like I do. Hm. I’d say that’s understandable. But I’d also refer back to something else you mentioned in your letter. You said that I gave you a moral compass that could only come from me. And you’re absolutely correct in your conclusion. All of my morals and beliefs have been transferred directly over to you. All of them. So yes, we may not be identical twins, but we most definitely ARE the same person. There’s no denying that simple fact.

You also made it a point to mention some of the great things that have been given to you. They’ve all helped you already, but the one in particular that we both know is most important is Sydney. Andrew, I’m convinced that you couldn’t be yourself without her by your side. You wouldn’t be able to do the job that you do. You would be a completely different person. I mean, if not for Sydney you wouldn’t have opened your own office. Ever. You probably wouldn’t have been able to make your way out of the Vega case. Think about what happened that night in the guest bedroom. Why do you think you were able to get out of there alive? Sydney. Period. This is another fact that cannot be questioned. She’s the very reason you do everything you do. But I’ll let you in on a little secret Sydney and I have kept from you. You’re all of those things to her. She’d be just as lost without you as you without her. Don’t forget that.

The final point you raised in your letter related to the types of cases that walk in your door. Yes, they’re not always as simple as you might like, but I send those particular individuals into your office because you’re the person they need. Not police. Not another private detective. You. But how you handle their cases is up to you. I can’t force you to take on a particular case any more than another. And I also can’t control its outcome. Your cases are yours. I just document the events that take place.

There’s one last point I’d like to make. Yes, you always seem to say or do the wrong thing when it comes to you and Sydney. Look, no relationship is perfect. But she loves you, madly. She’d literally sacrifice herself for you. I mean, look at what she did during the Vega case. I still can’t believe it as I sit here and write this. It wasn’t for your clients. Or for her. Or for some greater good. She did it all for you. No relationship is perfect, but she is. So do what she says. Always. And when you do manage to upset her you better make it right. Immediately.

Regards,

John Guillen

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5 thoughts on “A Letter to my Character

  1. Oh, the charm of first person point of view in a novel.

    I let it slip to Kinsey Millhone that you don’t really like her. You know how she is. She flipped the bird right back to you, John. Tsk tsk. You could be right about her, but I like her anyway. I really laugh about her one and only black, polyester dress.

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  2. I read your book and liked it, but I noticed then (and now) that you place an EXTREME amount of importance on having a relationship/love life. It’s interesting to see a male protagonist thinking that way, but I’m just wondering what inspired that? Or will it have an even bigger significant influence over the rest of the series?

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    • First off, if you read it I love you. Haha

      What inspired that? Hmm. I’d say reading so many detective novels in which the protagonist throw his or herself into cases and has little to no room for anything else in his life. Like a love interest. For instance, Alex Cross has had like five love interests through less than ten books I’ve read. That’s absurd. And he’s not the only one. So maybe that’s it?

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  3. Pingback: Supporting Writers | Write me a book, John!

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