I Lied

I voted Trump.

HA! No. Never.

But for once it appears I’m letting my curiosity get the best of me. I’m a huge fan of the Harry Potter movies. I’m not sure we’ll see a series done so well over so many movies in some time. I saw the final three movies on opening night. I saw the final two at midnight. So maybe I haven’t read all of the books but I’ve loved every minute of Harry, Ron, and Hermione.

And now Fantastic Beasts is tempting. See, y’all should know that I don’t see movies when they’re in theaters. The last one was Creed last December. I haven’t been in 2016. But the movie definitely looks intriguing AND I just found tickets for $4.99. I mean, my entire reasoning for not going to the movies is the absurd cost. Regular tickets are like $9. Then there’s 3D and IMAX and all kinds of crap that can potentially double the price of admission and it just drives me bonkers. But $5 isn’t so bad. I pay more when I buy a smoothie. Also, never buy food at the theater! I don’t.

Anyway, I’m thinking I might go see Fantastic Beasts next week. MIGHT. What about you?

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Too Much, Just Too Much

It was announced this week that Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them will not be adapted into three movies as previously announced. I know what you’re thinking. One movie, then, right? Wrong. Five. FIVE MOVIES.

I’ve already said before that I think anything having the slightest connection to Harry Potter is simply being shoved in our faces. JK Rowling is a person just like you and I. And right now she still sees dollar signs for her work. I’d take full advantage if I owned something that would likely net me tens or hundreds of millions of dollars. Sure. But it doesn’t mean everyone who loved the original movies and books will be stammering to get to theaters to see these movies.

I imagine they will do well, but the quality will likely be inferior to the original movies because there is one book setting the foundation for the movies rather than seven. I’ll be happy when there is nothing new related to Harry Potter.

Were you surprised when it was announced the tiny book would be adapted into a five film series?

The Numbers are in

Unfortunately the script for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is a runaway hit. In its first ten days in release the book version of the script has sold more than 3.3 million copies in North America alone. At the times of my original post on here and when I made my video for the script I hadn’t actually read any of the script. But now I have. Just a few bits and pieces to get a feel for the writing itself. My conclusion is quite simple. The writing is terrible. If no one had known anything about how this play came about and read this it would be obvious on page one that it wasn’t written by Rowling.

But there is some light at the end of the tunnel. Even with the great sales numbers they still don’t come close to the first day sales of Deathly Hallows, which sold more than 8 million copies in 2007. I’d say several factors are at play with the somewhat diminished numbers. First, it’s been nearly a decade since the final book was released. Second, this isn’t really a continuation of the series so many people know and love. Third, (and I saw this firsthand) a lot of people were unaware of this release. Fourth, the reviews. In my video last week I told y’all that it was rated 3.3 stars on Amazon after more than a thousand reviews. That trend is sticking. After more than 3000 reviews it is currently rated 3.4 stars out of 5. I think that number will stop people from buying who wanted to wait and see what initial readers thought of the script.

I’m hoping this doesn’t happen with the Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them adaptations. Every one of the original Potter movies (like the books) was well received by viewers and critics alike, but hearing that a sequel is already in the works before the original is even released has me scratching my head. I mean, Warner Bros. just gave everyone the terrible trilogy they adapted from The Hobbit. Let’s hope they don’t make a habit of it.