George R. R. Martin is Right on Track

So I’m lying here before bed just reading a few articles, right? I try reading as many book articles as I can in order to stay up-to-date on the happenings in the book world. But I don’t really have a particular type of article I like more than another. But I stumbled upon one about Mr. Martin.

I’m not a watcher of the HBO series based on his bestselling books, and I recently sold my copies of the books to my Half Price Books store in an effort to get books off of my TBR shelf I have no interest in reading. But I know a lot of criticism is thrown his way because everyone is so anxiously awaiting the release of the next book in the series.

Well, it turns out all those people are foolish. Mhm. The Washington Post created this graphic to show how fast authors publish books relative to the number of pages in their respective series. Take a look.

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His next book could come out next year and he’d still be writing at the same pace as the much beloved J.K. Rowling. Welp.

So get off his back and let the mam write.

Would you have ever guessed he’s writing at the same pace as her and faster than other prominent authors of the last century? I wouldn’t have just based on what everyone says about him.

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Game of Thrones on TV Will Finish Before the Books are Written

Wait, what?

I’ve never watched the series on TV or read any of the books, though I do have the first four now. I couldn’t tell you anything about it. Except that George R. R. Martin is the author and that he kills off characters all the time. I think?

Again, I can’t even talk about the differences between the TV show and the books, but this still seems a bit odd to me. Adaptations are not always loyal to the original work, but how can a TV series finish when there’s still more the author wants to tell in the story?

I think Martin has been between books for awhile now, right? So perhaps at this point he just doesn’t care anymore. Or maybe the show has contractual obligations to finish up at a particular point in time. I don’t know. And maybe the fans of the show don’t care how or when the show ends as long as it does.

To me, a series based on books should try to be as loyal to the original as possible. Otherwise, it could have been adapted into a movie. What do you think about all this?

Does Size REALLY Matter?

Hehe. Bet that title got your attention. But no, I’m not talking about sex. And I’m definitely not talking about male anatomy. I’ll leave that to the writers of erotica.

Anyway, I’m talking about books you filthy-minded people. We all have our own ways of deciding what to read next. I know I do. I have my TBR piggy that I’ve never once used. Which means that I usually just take a look at the last five books I’ve read, make sure I’m not reading the same author or series as any of those five, and pick a book. No special formula or anything.

BUT the length (size in the title of this post) does matter a little bit. The longest book I’ve ever read was 596 pages? I think. Which isn’t really too long. And I haven’t read any George R. R. Martin, even though I am somewhat interested in doing so. But his books are giant bricks, right? Eh. I just don’t feel like devoting such a long time to one book.

So yes, the length of the book matters to me. I like my books in the 300-450 page range. Not too long, not too short. What about you? Do you like your books longer? Average? Maybe a little on the short side? Ha. I really need to stop writing this now.


On this day in 2014 I published An Author’s Worst Enemy: Writer’s Block.

 

The Top Ten Books of 2014…on Twitter

BookVibe has compiled a list of books most mentioned on Twitter in 2014. Might as well just get into the list because I’m sure you’re more interested in the ten books than any preceding comments I have.

10. Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger

I suppose it would be unwise to think that a list like this wouldn’t include some classics, right? I mean, don’t high school kids have to read this? Maybe?

9. 1984 – George Orwell

I don’t know if high schoolers are reading this, but I’m not particularly surprised by it.

8. Jurassic Park – Michael Crichton

Hey. This is a definite surprise to me. It’s obvious that this made the list because of the new movie coming out next summer, but it is still nice to see people talking about it (even though we’re coming up on movie four and there are only two books.) But I read this in high school and then read the second one. Enjoyed both.

7. Eleanor and Park – Rainbow Rowell

Haven’t read this one, but I know it’s popular. My only question is if her real name is really Rainbow. And I actually know the titles of all of her books even though I haven’t read any of them. That’s cool.

6. Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn

When a book is adapted into a major movie that immediately gets some awards buzz going, well it’s hard to imagine a world in which Twitter isn’t right on board with that. Still haven’t read this, though I’m about 90 percent sure I know what happens. Eh.

5. Hannibal – Thomans Harris

Okay.

4. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

Obviously an American classic, but wasn’t this book just released as an e-book for the first time this year? Maybe that helped?

3. Looking for Alaska – John Green

I would have to go back and take a look at my banned books post, but I think this made the list. Cause I know it was published a few years ago and I figured that two of his other books would make this list over this one. Hm. What do I know?

2. A Game of Thrones – George R. R. Martin

There is absolutely nothing for me to say about this. Who wouldn’t expect this?

1. The Fault in Our Stars – John Green

Well it sure looks like John Green is right at the top of the literary world at the moment. Heck, this is the only book on the list I read in 2014. And he has another movie coming out next June. And is there anyone out there who doesn’t think his other works will be adapted at some point? Doubt it. I still would just like to mention that I have the same initials as John Green. Cause that somehow matters. This book actually had more than double the mentions on Twitter as the second book on the list. Sheesh.

So that’s it! The top ten books of 2014 on Twitter. Any surprises?