And There’s More

I just wrote about Holocaust denial books that are available on Amazon, right? Of course there are even more books on the site that have no business seeing the light of day. This time I’m talking about books that claim to “cure” illnesses and ailments.

Autism appears to be written about quite a bit. Books utilizing what’s called MMS claim to be able to cure autism, among others. Except there is nothing scientific about the so-called treatment. And it’s been linked to at least one death in recent years.

Y’all know I don’t have kids. I can only imagine how difficult it might be to have a child with any kind of developmental deficiency. The medical bills and lost wages can quickly add up. So a part of me understands why someone would go to books in search of a cure for something inflicting their family.

With that being said, this isn’t the way to accomplish anything. Doctors and nurses can point you to the right literature. And there’s always the option of adoption if the diagnosis is known beforehand. No one is responsible for making another family whole, but there are so many people who would be excellent parents and would appropriately care for a child with special needs. No one should be subject to bogus treatments that only endanger rather than treat.

Autism, for example, doesn’t need to be cured. If these parents or people buying these bogus books had ever met someone with autism, then they’d know that.

Saturday Selects: New Year’s resolutions are a joke

new-years-resolution

Saturday Selects is a series of posts I write the first Saturday of each month in which I discuss something unrelated to the general bookish theme of the blog. This month we’re talking about those damn resolutions everyone is talking about.

“I’m going to the gym more.”

“I’m eating healthier.”

“I’ll start looking for a better job.”

These are just a few examples of resolutions people tend to toss out just about every year. And they piss me off. I have no issue with setting GOALS for a new year. I mean, I’d hope you have some goals for yourself. But what I don’t understand is how come everyone and their mom has to suddenly decide to change just because the calendar says January and the year has changed. I don’t understand this.

I want someone to tell me why January is the only month of the year that one can decide to change for the better. I’ll wait so you can type your response…

Still waiting…

Got nothing? Thought so. It’s stupid. 330 days out of the year you’re perfectly fine with yourself. But oh wait, January comes around and suddenly you want to be better. Yeah…no.

If you really wanted to change something about yourself or do some things differently, then you’d have done so long before the new year. If you want to come up with a meaningless list of things you’re going to do differently, then that’s when you start running around telling everyone your resolutions for the new year. News flash: you’re not fooling anyone. Not even yourself.

Rant over.