What Got You Hooked?

I wrote yesterday about first being drawn to books and reading in general by mysteries, and even more specifically detective stories.

Didn’t even cross my mind to ask what it was for you all. What originally got you hooked on books? Was it a certain book or genre? Or maybe a teacher or library you frequented? I’m curious.

But I remember checking books out of my middle school library every one in awhile. In high school it was largely the same because I started using the public library once I realized there were these places that kept ALL the books and all I needed was a ride to get them.

So tell me!

Advertisements

On the Denver Public Library

The Denver Public Library is more than just a library. It offers public restrooms and has ample space to encourage any and all to enter.

It’s essentially acting as a homeless shelter during the day. No one is allowed to sleep, but anyone can enter And walk amongst the materials. There are computers, Internet access, and just about a million other things.

The library has social workers on staff. This is the kind of institution libraries should be. Bettering the lives of those in its community. I hope other library systems take note.

Harvard Library Will Stop Charging Late Fees

Harvard library will stop charging late fees for regular loan items. Why? Because it’s stressful for students. I actually just read an article that pokes fun at this new development. Basically saying that all students at the school are rich and a genius and this new perk will do nothing for them. I disagree.

I’m not of the opinion that the most stressful topic in the minds of Harvard students is their overdue library books. I’m also not going to criticize the library for making this change. What good comes from that?

Fines Everywhere

Whenever I play around online to read book stories I always come across the same story over and over again. Fines.

People paying ridiculous fines for library books long overdue. The problem I have is that libraries need a better system to collect fines. I’d say take a page from Redbox. Swipe your card when you check out a book and once it’s overdue the library will automatically charge you until the book is paid for. Then it’s yours.

But seeing people pay $1500+ or 40 years’ worth of fines is beyond reason. There’s no point for that. Libraries have adapted their offerings, so why not adapt how they take fines?

What’s the largest fine you’ve ever paid for overdue library books? Mine is probably around $1.

Using the Dewey Decimal System

I’ve said I don’t utilize my local library system nearly as much as I should. But there once was a time in which I did. During my early teen years I constantly made my mom take me to the library to check out new books. But there was always one constant. I never browsed. I always reserved books beforehand, which leads me to the Dewey Decimal System.

I have no idea how to use it. I remember in school all library books would have a decimal on the spine for classification purposes. I never understood it then and I still don’t understand it now. Granted, I have no experience in library science.

I know some libraries have abandoned the system in recent years, but why not just organize the library in the same manner bookstores are organized? That doesn’t seem unreasonable. And I bet library patrons would better be able to navigate the library.

Am I the only one here?

DC Public Libraries to Celebrate Banned Books

I’m not sure exactly when Banned Books Week takes place, but I know it’s in September.

Bookstores, libraries, and other organizations celebrate banned books each year to highlight books that were once (or currently are) challenged. And DC public libraries are doing something fun this year. Throughout the course of the month the public library system in the capitol is hiding hundreds of copies of banned books all around the city. Clues to help find the books will be given on the system’s social media accounts and the books will feature covers describing why the book was challenged. 

Also, the books are free to keep!

I don’t know what any libraries or bookstores near me are doing, but if I lived in DC I’d definitely be trying to find me some banned books. Never mind that I likely don’t know the city well enough to find anything.

Have you heard of any unique events to celebrate Banned Books Week in your area?

Return Your Library Books or Else

Jail. That’s right. If you don’t return your library books in a timely manner then you could be looking at time in the slammer.

A library in Georgia is enforcing new rules to recover more than $200,000 in materials. I mean, I really hope this isn’t the case at most libraries around the country. That’s obviously unsustainable.

What I don’t understand is how the library says it will be enforcing new rules such as the jail time. The library can’t write laws. Unless the rules aren’t actually new and the library just hasn’t been enforcing them. If I knew someone had 20 books from the library just sitting at home and I had the legal standing to have them arrested, I think I would.

It is no different from stealing. And in the case of the library it amounts to stealing from taxpayers.

I’m hoping people just return their books and pay their fines before the question of jail time arises. Everyone knows unreturned library materials are just sitting at home anyway.

The policy sends the person a postcard about their overdue items, then a text or email, then a court summons, then jail time could be on the table if that is ignored.

Do you have any stories of overdue library books? I remember one. I think it may have been overdue by about a month or two. But I didn’t drive at the time and I usually had to force one of my parents to take me to the library. I think my fine ended up being $1 or something.