On Netflix’s “You”

There’s a show on Netflix called “You”. Very, very basic premise is a guy appears to fall in love with a girl and becomes completely obsessed with her. Nothing else from me.

For anyone who has already watched the first season, yes I know it originally was on another network.

This has been really intriguing to me. One, it’s based on a book I’ve never heard of by an author I’ve never heard of. And the premise is intense once you’re just a few minutes in.

But I won’t spoil anything if you think of checking it out. When I’ve been watching I’ve been thinking of literary adaptations as movies vs shows. In the 10 episode first season it’s 7-8 hours of screen time. Movies are often below 2 hours.

Every Harry Potter movie was excellent. I think all of them were 2+ hours, except for the final one. On the other side Thirteen Reasons Why’s first season was 13 episodes, 10+ hours of screen time.

I think the right decision was made for both series, but that isn’t always the case. I would have loved a series for The Martian! There was so much in the book that got lost onscreen because of the time limitations.

Do you have a prefer movies or hows when it comes to adaptations? My favorite show right now is Bosch, adapted as a series on Amazon.

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Why, Marie Kondo, Why?

If you spend any time browsing Netflix, then you’ve seen that Marie Kondo has a new show that recently debuted. I can probably use some help tidying up, but I have no interest in the show.

But when you follow literary accounts on Twitter it’s hard to not hear about book-related “controversies”. Apparently she’s advising people to throw out their books and the internet of readers is having none of it.

I live in a small apartment by myself. And I’ll most likely have to get two new bookshelves this year. It hasn’t once crossed my mind that instead of new bookshelves I should just rid myself of my books. I just…can’t. Even though I’m not exactly sure where I’ll put the new ones when I have them.

But maybe I’m crazy.

I did it

I got a new job working for a major publisher! Penguin Random House. I kept it under wraps from everyone, and thank goodness for technology. Didn’t even have to miss work!

Welp. If you believed that, well I don’t know what to tell ya. What I really did was begin reading Thirteen Reasons Why. I’m near certain I’ll release a video next week once I finish it. Too many people talking not to throw my thoughts into the fray.

That’s all. Minor announcement.

Why, Netflix, Why?

It was announced yesterday that Netflix has renewed Thirteen Reasons Why for a second season. I actually just told someone recently I’d be interested in finding out what happens once the season ends. That wasn’t a lie. What I didnt want is another season added on to something I believe ended perfectly. The story was told. The end was the end.

I think Netflix bought into its own hype. As much data and research goes into releasing a TV show on any platform, no one can ever truly predict the reaction of the viewer. Everything I’ve read tells me the reaction of the viewer of this show has been overwhelmingly positive.

Am I surprised this happened? No. At some point we have to acknowledge great books, TV shows, or movies simply don’t need sequels or more seasons. Last I checked the book never had a sequel.

Do you have any thoughts on a forthcoming second season?

Another Person Hooked on “Thirteen Reasons Why”

I think my mom was actually the first in my family to have a Netflix account. Several years ago. But then that account was canceled. I think. And now I’m the only one besides other brothers and sisters with an account.

This weekend my mom was searching for something to watch on Netflix and I had to recommend something. I recommended the adaptation from Jay Asher’s bestselling novel. She watched the first three episodes last night and I think she’s really looking to continue the series throughout this week. I think I should be given a referral from Netflix. What do you guys think? 

On “Thirteen Reasons Why”

SPOILERS AHEAD

I posted yesterday about starting the Netflix series Thirteen Reasons Why. The series is based on the 2007 novel of the same name by Jay Asher.

I watched all 13 episodes in two days. I’ve not read the book, but after watching the first season I imagine the book is incredible.

The themes of the story include suicide, bullying, and rape. There’s more but this post would be 10,000 words if I discussed all of them.

Hannah Baker commits suicide after a series of events leads her to believe her life is no longer worth living. One event was a picture of her in an unflattering position sent around her school. Another was that she witnessed her friend get raped. Another was her own rape by the same student. The final event was that her counselor was unhelpful in her final reach for help.

Hannah records 13 tapes describing the things that were done to her in the time leading up to her suicide. Those tapes are given to the people mentioned on them after her death.

What’s most devastating about the story is that it isn’t really fiction. Rape and sexual assault may not happen at every middle and high school, but bullying? Yes. Cyberbullying? Yes. Verbal abuse? Yes.

Kids and teens are brutal. There’s no reason to question this. How many people don’t talk about their time in high school or college because they’re ashamed of the things they were doing at the time?

We have a president on tape bragging about sexual assault. What’s worse is 60+ million people STILL voted for him. It’s hard to address serious topics like sexual assault and rape if it’s being normalized.

No form of bullying is ever okay. No form of sexual assault is ever okay. No rape is ever okay. Depression and anxiety can be incredibly difficult things to deal with on your own. If you or someone you know is ever having urges to self-harm or commit suicide, then talk. Talk to a friend. Talk to a family member. Talk to a teacher. Talk to someone. Because then that burden is no longer on the shoulders of one individual.

You can speak to someone anonymously 24/7 by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or by visiting suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

This story is so much more than a story. It’s a wake up call to people who downplay the consequences of bullying and sexual violence. Why is it so hard to believe that people can push others to believe that death is the only solution to their pain and angst? Why is it so hard to believe that people who commit suicide were failed by people, policies, and institutions? Why is it so hard to DISCUSS suicide?

Just a couple of years ago someone told me they were having suicidal thoughts. But that person wasn’t nearby. I couldn’t just get in my car and go help. I told that person to speak with someone. Any one. I never told them, but I was terrified. I was terrified that I wouldn’t be able to do enough. That I might text the wrong thing and make things worse. I don’t know for sure how that person ultimately handled their depression, but I do know they’re doing quite well now.

This story is the heartbreaking stories we see on the news every week. But it serves to show us all that we are not alone in our struggles. Even when things are at their absolute worst, someone will be there. The title of the book refers to 13 reasons why Hannah took her life. But it could just as easily refer to 13 people or things that could have saved it. Every human life is precious. Every single one. Yet we find ourselves valuing some more than others, and not valuing others at all.

This book is immensely popular. Please tell me your thoughts.

A Pleasant Surprise

I’m not always the biggest fan of literary adaptations, although there are definitely exceptions. Yesterday afternoon I opened up Netflix to see if there was any documentary I might be interested in watching. Before I even browsed the documentaries I came across something else. Thirteen Reasons Why.

I may be mistaken, but I think this book is assigned in some schools in my area. I’ve never read it but I know it’s still popular a decade after publication. I had no idea what the book was about. Then I watched the first episode.

What I’ve watched so far (6 episodes) reminds me of Looking for Alaska. There’s a death. And everyone is trying to piece together what happened.

I’ve enjoyed the series. I’ll always enjoy a book that hits on relevant topics. Suicide prevention and bullying will always be important topics to stay informed about, and those two things are at the forefront of this book.

Have you read the book or watched the Netflix series? Thoughts?