New Clean Reader App Removes “Offensive Language” From Your Books

Most books I read have some cussing. Not pages and pages of it, but some. Well (if you don’t like characters cussing) you no longer have to read those words. You know the ones I’m talking about. There’s a new app called Clean Reader that essentially barricades you from cuss words in your books. And it’s easy to use. All you do is download the app and set your settings based on how much or how little you want the language to be changed. Oh, the app isn’t only for cussing. It covers A LOT of different words and phrases and is constantly adding more.

But you have to purchase the books through the app. So you can’t read on your Kindle, Nook, and I’m not sure what the app is like on iPhones and iPads.

I understand that some people don’t like “offensive language” in their reading, but I’m not a fan of this. How many rounds of edits and rewrites did it take for the book to reach its final state? Plenty. And all along the way the language could have been changed but wasn’t. I just don’t think an author’s work should be changed (drastically, in some cases) without his or her permission to cater to some reader. If you really don’t like the language THEN DON’T READ THE BOOK. How hard is that?

Anyway, what do you think of an app that essentially censors books? I hope it fails miserably.

You can read more about the app here. It is available in the App Store and Google Play. I won’t be linking to it.


On this day in 2014 I published What’s That one Series of Books you Won’t Forget?.

 

Print Books Here to Stay

ebooks-vs-printed-books

Photo Credit: Julie Griffin

Okay guys, anyone who reads about books or the publishing industry on any kind of regular basis has read at some point in the last couple of years about the demise of printed books. I know I have. I’ve always been the person to roll my eyes and acknowledge that those writing such pieces had no real information to back up their claims that printed books were a dying product.

I know what you’re thinking. What about Kindle? Or even iBooks or the Nook? Ebooks have certainly changed the publishing industry, there’s no doubt about that, but to say that ebooks have moved printed books toward the brink of extinction has never been close to reality. Obviously when something new comes along everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon. Ebooks saw triple digit rates of growth for years, until 2013 saw the rate slip into the single digits. With the first six months of 2014 showing evidence that the growth rates of ebooks may have leveled off with ebooks making up just 23 percent of the market, with hardcovers at 25 percent, and paperbacks at 42 percent. Look at that. People are buying those big, bulky, overly expensive hardcovers more than they are buying ebooks at the moment.

Ebooks aren’t going anywhere, but neither are printed books. So I kindly ask that you stop writing articles that are strictly your opinion with no basis in fact. Thanks.

You can read an article on the topic here.

Are Bookmarks Dead?

ImagePhoto Credit: Pixopa

Bookmarks. No, I’m not talking about that little tab at the top of your browser that saves your favorite websites for easy navigation. I’m talking those things that we used to put on the insides of our books to save our page.

I’ve never been a huge fan of bookmarks. But I always liked looking at all the cool designs at my elementary school book fairs. And at Barnes and Noble on that little twisty thing. You could always find one that caught your interest that you just had to buy. Give me a bookmark with Katniss on it! Matter of fact, give me all of the bookmarks with Katniss on them! Or Hermione. But really, I probably wouldn’t even use those. One of my older brothers gave me some really fancy bookmarks for Christmas in 2012? And I never even removed them from the packaging. Don’t worry, he doesn’t read this.

And with the advent of e-readers, bookmarks have become even more obsolete than ever before. Your Kindle or Nook or iPad stop exactly where you stop reading. Or you can just use the page numbers as your reference, but you’re never putting your e-reader away with a bookmark sticking out of the top. I mean, that would look a little funny if you did.

I keep my page by remembering where I leave off. For instance, I read in 50 page increments. I’ll never stop a chapter short of the 45th page of reading, so it’s fairly easy for me to keep my place without using a snazzy little bookmark. And I NEVER dog ear my pages. If you do that then I’m punching you in the face. Right now. That’s just cruel and one of the reasons why I’ve never once lent out one of my books to anyone. If I got it back like that I’d be forcing them to get me a new one.

So tell me, do you still use bookmarks, or do you have another way of keeping your page in the book you’re reading? I’m not asking you e-book freaks.