And There’s More

I just wrote about Holocaust denial books that are available on Amazon, right? Of course there are even more books on the site that have no business seeing the light of day. This time I’m talking about books that claim to “cure” illnesses and ailments.

Autism appears to be written about quite a bit. Books utilizing what’s called MMS claim to be able to cure autism, among others. Except there is nothing scientific about the so-called treatment. And it’s been linked to at least one death in recent years.

Y’all know I don’t have kids. I can only imagine how difficult it might be to have a child with any kind of developmental deficiency. The medical bills and lost wages can quickly add up. So a part of me understands why someone would go to books in search of a cure for something inflicting their family.

With that being said, this isn’t the way to accomplish anything. Doctors and nurses can point you to the right literature. And there’s always the option of adoption if the diagnosis is known beforehand. No one is responsible for making another family whole, but there are so many people who would be excellent parents and would appropriately care for a child with special needs. No one should be subject to bogus treatments that only endanger rather than treat.

Autism, for example, doesn’t need to be cured. If these parents or people buying these bogus books had ever met someone with autism, then they’d know that.

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How Many is too Many?

A library in St. Louis County has launched an initiative to get parents reading to their kids before kindergarten. But I think their goal is a bit lofty. Parents are encouraged through prizes to read 1000 books to their child before they reach kindergarten.

That’s a thousand books in the first five years of their life. I know the books are short and you can read multiple books in a single day, but new parents aren’t exactly full of free time. Obviously the program is designed to create and enhance better language skills and vocabulary, but eh. I don’t know how many books were read to me before kindergarten, but I know it wasn’t close to a thousand of them. 

Do you think this library is on to something or just a little too enthusiastic with its expectations?