James Patterson has a new Co-writer

AND HIS NAME IS JOHN CENA! 😂

I really can’t resist any opportunity to type that out. I don’t think y’all find it nearly as entertaining as I do. But meh.

The real person Patterson is co writing a book with is President Clinton. No, this isn’t an alternate universe in which Hillary actually won. It’s Bill. Bill Clinton and James Patterson are writing a book together. Welp.

The quality of Patterson’s work is what it is. I simply don’t see how this would do anything to change that. Bill Clinton has never written a novel. But Patterson does whatever he possibly can to sell as many books as he can. This appears to fall in line with the things he’s done before.

Do you have any interest in a book written by President Clinton and James Patterson? I know I don’t.

Why, Netflix, Why?

It was announced yesterday that Netflix has renewed Thirteen Reasons Why for a second season. I actually just told someone recently I’d be interested in finding out what happens once the season ends. That wasn’t a lie. What I didnt want is another season added on to something I believe ended perfectly. The story was told. The end was the end.

I think Netflix bought into its own hype. As much data and research goes into releasing a TV show on any platform, no one can ever truly predict the reaction of the viewer. Everything I’ve read tells me the reaction of the viewer of this show has been overwhelmingly positive.

Am I surprised this happened? No. At some point we have to acknowledge great books, TV shows, or movies simply don’t need sequels or more seasons. Last I checked the book never had a sequel.

Do you have any thoughts on a forthcoming second season?

Goodreads…For Love?

Guys, this is probably going to sound stupid to some of y’all. Fair warning.

I’ve never really had a real relationship with anyone before. There are a number of contributing factors to this statistic of mine, but I believe I know the top one. I’ve never really wanted to be in one. You know those people who are ALWAYS in a relationship? Like, they’ll be with someone for a year, break up, and then a month later they’re with someone else. Oh boy, do I know those people. Lots of them. Just think of me as the complete opposite.

When I think of my priorities right now I come up with a few. Travel. Learning. Improving. See, even as I write this I wouldn’t list a relationship anywhere near the top of my list of things I want to do. But I can see your all-knowing gaze. You’re thinking I wouldn’t be writing this if I wasn’t feeling more open to the idea, right? Welp. You caught me.

When I think of myself and the whole dating scene I’m just like “WHAA?”. And when I think of all the so-called dating apps I’m just like 🏃. That’s me running away for those of you on a computer.

We have dating apps for everyone. Farmers. Christians. Different ethnicities. Sexual preference. Casual sex. Over 50. And on and on. Why hasn’t someone developed an app for people who may or may not be obsessed with books!? This is a serious question. That’s an app I’d download and fill out a full profile for. I mean, why not? Other dating apps oftentimes have questionnaires in order to “match” users. I’d rather compare my responses to book-related questions than the crap that gets asked in other apps. I’ll even offer some easy starter ones to get you and your developer friend off the ground running.

“Have you read Fifty Shades of Grey”?

“Do you rate every book you read 4 or 5 stars?”

“How often do you give books as gifts?”

“When was the last time you started and finished a book in a single day?”

“Rank these in order of importance: books, oxygen, water, shelter, food.”

I mean, tell me this isn’t a fantastic idea! I want this app. I want someone to read this and believe it could work. Then I want someone to develop it. Then I want to download it. Then, well, let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves here.

Are you aware of any literary-centered dating apps currently available? If yes, tell me. If not, go find one. 😎

UPDATE: After writing this but before publishing I discovered that there was a dating site devoted to book lovers. It was called Alikewise. It shut down last year. Guys, I could have missed my opportunity to find *gulp* “the one”. I’m sad.

How Many More Books Will You Read Before You Die?

I’ve actually been wanting to write a post about this since seeing the original article written about a month ago. But I told myself that I’d only write it when I had time to sit down and focus rather than just typing something up on my phone. Today is that day.

Before I get into any of the details here I want to state my reservations about the whole thing. Some might say this is scientific. Others might say the original author quantified the question. But I believe both statements to be false. Information was taken from the Social Security Life Expectancy Calculator and combined with reading data from the Pew Research Center.The author essentially took two averages and plugged those numbers into a graph. There’s nothing wrong with that, but let’s be honest about how accurate the numbers really are before even getting into the numbers.

First, you should know who is falling into which group of reader. Average = 12 books a year. Voracious = 50 books a year. Super = 80 books a year. The author used those numbers to “calculate” how many more books we’ll read based on how much we read and our life expectancy. I’m a 25-year-old male who falls somewhere between being an average and voracious reader. According to the data I’ll read between 684 and 2850 more books during the course of my lifetime. That’s quite the range for something that claims to utilize data. But that’s what it says.

How about you? Two questions here. First, how many books does the data say you’ll read before that funny thing called death? And how many do YOU actually think you’ll read? I’ll say I think I’ll be able to read exactly 3429 more books over the rest of my life. The best part is I keep track of all that information. My tally starts today.

For all you Book Smellers

I typically laugh when people mention the smell of a book. Because books don’t smell like anything but paper. Anyway, scientists are now attempting to archive the smell of old books. Yes, really.

I’m not sure what they might be working in if they weren’t archiving the smell of books, but surely there is something more important than this. There must be. I don’t know what the stated goal is but it does sound like museums and libraries may be possible “beneficiaries”, if you can even call them such. Museums would have a more authentic smell and libraries, well, I have no idea. Go buy a book perfume and spray it around if the smell is so great. But conducting some kind if scientific experiment for this seems pointless.

Are you a book smeller? Please say no.

On “Thirteen Reasons Why”

SPOILERS AHEAD

I posted yesterday about starting the Netflix series Thirteen Reasons Why. The series is based on the 2007 novel of the same name by Jay Asher.

I watched all 13 episodes in two days. I’ve not read the book, but after watching the first season I imagine the book is incredible.

The themes of the story include suicide, bullying, and rape. There’s more but this post would be 10,000 words if I discussed all of them.

Hannah Baker commits suicide after a series of events leads her to believe her life is no longer worth living. One event was a picture of her in an unflattering position sent around her school. Another was that she witnessed her friend get raped. Another was her own rape by the same student. The final event was that her counselor was unhelpful in her final reach for help.

Hannah records 13 tapes describing the things that were done to her in the time leading up to her suicide. Those tapes are given to the people mentioned on them after her death.

What’s most devastating about the story is that it isn’t really fiction. Rape and sexual assault may not happen at every middle and high school, but bullying? Yes. Cyberbullying? Yes. Verbal abuse? Yes.

Kids and teens are brutal. There’s no reason to question this. How many people don’t talk about their time in high school or college because they’re ashamed of the things they were doing at the time?

We have a president on tape bragging about sexual assault. What’s worse is 60+ million people STILL voted for him. It’s hard to address serious topics like sexual assault and rape if it’s being normalized.

No form of bullying is ever okay. No form of sexual assault is ever okay. No rape is ever okay. Depression and anxiety can be incredibly difficult things to deal with on your own. If you or someone you know is ever having urges to self-harm or commit suicide, then talk. Talk to a friend. Talk to a family member. Talk to a teacher. Talk to someone. Because then that burden is no longer on the shoulders of one individual.

You can speak to someone anonymously 24/7 by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or by visiting suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

This story is so much more than a story. It’s a wake up call to people who downplay the consequences of bullying and sexual violence. Why is it so hard to believe that people can push others to believe that death is the only solution to their pain and angst? Why is it so hard to believe that people who commit suicide were failed by people, policies, and institutions? Why is it so hard to DISCUSS suicide?

Just a couple of years ago someone told me they were having suicidal thoughts. But that person wasn’t nearby. I couldn’t just get in my car and go help. I told that person to speak with someone. Any one. I never told them, but I was terrified. I was terrified that I wouldn’t be able to do enough. That I might text the wrong thing and make things worse. I don’t know for sure how that person ultimately handled their depression, but I do know they’re doing quite well now.

This story is the heartbreaking stories we see on the news every week. But it serves to show us all that we are not alone in our struggles. Even when things are at their absolute worst, someone will be there. The title of the book refers to 13 reasons why Hannah took her life. But it could just as easily refer to 13 people or things that could have saved it. Every human life is precious. Every single one. Yet we find ourselves valuing some more than others, and not valuing others at all.

This book is immensely popular. Please tell me your thoughts.