Is It Really All About Money?

I’ve read this week about two lawsuits currently pending. They both concern the work of authors who have died. And in both cases it’s one part of the family suing another part.

One of the lawsuits concerns the work of John Steinbeck. The other is about Tom Clancy.

What happened to preserving the legacy of authors once they die? So many times lawsuits are filed almost immediately upon the death of an author. I guess this is no different from other types of celebrities who leave their families to fight over large estates. But it’s still a bit disappointing.

I think Robert B. Parker did it best. He left his series in the hands of other authors he knew. Though I’m not sure I’ll ever be able to read a Spenser or Jesse Stone novel written by another author, at least there was no fight when Parker died unexpectedly.

Do you think it immediately becomes all about the money involved once an author dies?

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Books I Recommended to Someone who Asked for a sad Read

The actual request was for a book that may make them cry.

Lone Survivor

Night

To Kill a Mockingbird

The Martian

All of the books have completely different storylines. Two are based in fact. Two are not. The common thing from all of them is that I believe there are lessons to be learned from each. Just like there’s a lesson to be learned from nearly every book ever published. The messaging may be off and the writing poor, but find a book in which you take nothing away from it and I’ll gladly hand you hundreds in which you’ll find something hidden beneath the printed words.

What was the last book that made you cry?

James Patterson has a new Co-writer

AND HIS NAME IS JOHN CENA! 😂

I really can’t resist any opportunity to type that out. I don’t think y’all find it nearly as entertaining as I do. But meh.

The real person Patterson is co writing a book with is President Clinton. No, this isn’t an alternate universe in which Hillary actually won. It’s Bill. Bill Clinton and James Patterson are writing a book together. Welp.

The quality of Patterson’s work is what it is. I simply don’t see how this would do anything to change that. Bill Clinton has never written a novel. But Patterson does whatever he possibly can to sell as many books as he can. This appears to fall in line with the things he’s done before.

Do you have any interest in a book written by President Clinton and James Patterson? I know I don’t.

Why, Netflix, Why?

It was announced yesterday that Netflix has renewed Thirteen Reasons Why for a second season. I actually just told someone recently I’d be interested in finding out what happens once the season ends. That wasn’t a lie. What I didnt want is another season added on to something I believe ended perfectly. The story was told. The end was the end.

I think Netflix bought into its own hype. As much data and research goes into releasing a TV show on any platform, no one can ever truly predict the reaction of the viewer. Everything I’ve read tells me the reaction of the viewer of this show has been overwhelmingly positive.

Am I surprised this happened? No. At some point we have to acknowledge great books, TV shows, or movies simply don’t need sequels or more seasons. Last I checked the book never had a sequel.

Do you have any thoughts on a forthcoming second season?

Goodreads…For Love?

Guys, this is probably going to sound stupid to some of y’all. Fair warning.

I’ve never really had a real relationship with anyone before. There are a number of contributing factors to this statistic of mine, but I believe I know the top one. I’ve never really wanted to be in one. You know those people who are ALWAYS in a relationship? Like, they’ll be with someone for a year, break up, and then a month later they’re with someone else. Oh boy, do I know those people. Lots of them. Just think of me as the complete opposite.

When I think of my priorities right now I come up with a few. Travel. Learning. Improving. See, even as I write this I wouldn’t list a relationship anywhere near the top of my list of things I want to do. But I can see your all-knowing gaze. You’re thinking I wouldn’t be writing this if I wasn’t feeling more open to the idea, right? Welp. You caught me.

When I think of myself and the whole dating scene I’m just like “WHAA?”. And when I think of all the so-called dating apps I’m just like 🏃. That’s me running away for those of you on a computer.

We have dating apps for everyone. Farmers. Christians. Different ethnicities. Sexual preference. Casual sex. Over 50. And on and on. Why hasn’t someone developed an app for people who may or may not be obsessed with books!? This is a serious question. That’s an app I’d download and fill out a full profile for. I mean, why not? Other dating apps oftentimes have questionnaires in order to “match” users. I’d rather compare my responses to book-related questions than the crap that gets asked in other apps. I’ll even offer some easy starter ones to get you and your developer friend off the ground running.

“Have you read Fifty Shades of Grey”?

“Do you rate every book you read 4 or 5 stars?”

“How often do you give books as gifts?”

“When was the last time you started and finished a book in a single day?”

“Rank these in order of importance: books, oxygen, water, shelter, food.”

I mean, tell me this isn’t a fantastic idea! I want this app. I want someone to read this and believe it could work. Then I want someone to develop it. Then I want to download it. Then, well, let’s not get too far ahead of ourselves here.

Are you aware of any literary-centered dating apps currently available? If yes, tell me. If not, go find one. 😎

UPDATE: After writing this but before publishing I discovered that there was a dating site devoted to book lovers. It was called Alikewise. It shut down last year. Guys, I could have missed my opportunity to find *gulp* “the one”. I’m sad.

How Many More Books Will You Read Before You Die?

I’ve actually been wanting to write a post about this since seeing the original article written about a month ago. But I told myself that I’d only write it when I had time to sit down and focus rather than just typing something up on my phone. Today is that day.

Before I get into any of the details here I want to state my reservations about the whole thing. Some might say this is scientific. Others might say the original author quantified the question. But I believe both statements to be false. Information was taken from the Social Security Life Expectancy Calculator and combined with reading data from the Pew Research Center.The author essentially took two averages and plugged those numbers into a graph. There’s nothing wrong with that, but let’s be honest about how accurate the numbers really are before even getting into the numbers.

First, you should know who is falling into which group of reader. Average = 12 books a year. Voracious = 50 books a year. Super = 80 books a year. The author used those numbers to “calculate” how many more books we’ll read based on how much we read and our life expectancy. I’m a 25-year-old male who falls somewhere between being an average and voracious reader. According to the data I’ll read between 684 and 2850 more books during the course of my lifetime. That’s quite the range for something that claims to utilize data. But that’s what it says.

How about you? Two questions here. First, how many books does the data say you’ll read before that funny thing called death? And how many do YOU actually think you’ll read? I’ll say I think I’ll be able to read exactly 3429 more books over the rest of my life. The best part is I keep track of all that information. My tally starts today.