Reading From Start to Finish

All readers are different, right? They like what they like and they dislike whatever they dislike. But sometimes those differences make me scratch my head, like when someone doesn’t read a book from start to finish.

I’ve seen and been told by other readers that they don’t read from start to finish. They’ll start a book and then for whatever reason just skip to the ending. Or they’ll read from the middle outward. Like, huh? I don’t understand the point of doing anything like this. If you don’t like the book you’re reading, then read something else. I don’t see how you can fully grasp a story if you’re reading it in a manner that (in my opinion) simply cannot carry the same entertainment value as it would if it were being read from start to finish.

Perhaps I’m crazy here and people do this kind of thing all the time, but that wouldn’t make it any more reasonable to me. Do you read from start to finish?


On this day in 2014 I published An Agent Represents my Second Book! Whaaaaaat!?.

PS: I asked y’all to pick my next read in yesterday’s post, so go vote if you haven’t done so already! I’ll take votes for one week.

 

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Are you a Book Snob?

We’re all honest here. There’s no need to lie. So, are you? Wait, let me first tell you a little about what it means to be book snob in the first place.

Before I start defining things, this is definitely a term that is defined differently by different people. But I’ve come to my definition based on what I’ve seen and read from many different sources and individuals. In the simplest of terms (to me), a book snob is someone who views their reading and the books they read as superior to the reading habits and books read by others.

Here’s a little scenario to give you a little more insight into some book snobby behavior. Let’s say you have two readers. One is working on reading as many classics as he can. The other just finished a five book erotica series. The first reader posts outrageous negative comments on the second reader’s blog because “those books aren’t worthy of reading”.

Everyone can tell who the book snob is in that particular situation. But it may not always be that obvious, and it may be you. One of the things that people have tried to say is that it’s really just people having different reading preferences. But there’s a big difference between different preferences and book snobbery.

Preferences: “I read crime novels and you read YA. We’re interested in different things.”

Book snobbery: “I read crime novels and you should too because it’s better than that crap you’ve been reading.”

Super obvious again, I know. But how many times have you interacted with someone either on here or Twitter or maybe even Goodreads and they seem to be against anything you’re reading? That person is most likely a book snob. Hopefully it isn’t you.

Are you a book snob or not?


On this day in 2014 I published Authors, Tell the Titles of Your Books!.

 

What do you Read While you Write?

I read an interesting article earlier today written by two authors that got me thinking a little bit.

Now obviously I’m not talking about actually writing and reading at the same time. What I mean is during the days or months that you’re working on a writing project, what do you read? And my answer to this particular question is a little perplexing. I don’t. I don’t read while I’m writing. Which is completely bizarre, but I think it’s true. 2013 and 2014, the only years for which I could possibly try to answer this question, were my two worst reading years in recent memory. And those were the two years in which I was writing.

But I think I’m the odd man out here. Because I know several bloggers who manage to read 50-75 books each year while writing more than I ever have. But I also bet there are a few people in similar situations to mine. But I’ll only know if you tell me!

So, what do you read while you write?

Millennials Read More Than You

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Yep. You read that right. Pew Research Center just recently released a report that says as much. Want to know what I think about it? Here’s my entire response….HA!

If you play around on WordPress or just the internet in general you’re likely to come across dozens of articles (blog posts) that start with something like “People just aren’t reading anymore.” or “Do people even read books anymore?” or “Books are dead.” I know you know what I’m talking about. But these are all just opinions of individuals who have no idea what they’re talking about. They think that because they don’t read and probably their friends and family don’t read that that means every other person in America also doesn’t read. Like…huh?

I’ve read way too many articles about books and publishing and all that stuff to know better. But what does this mean? What does it mean that millennials are reading more than older Americans? For one, if your mom or dad reads more than you then you have a problem. Second, ALL of you people writing about how no one reads anymore and blah blah blah can shut up. That’s what. And if you’re one of those people who has been thinking that, then you should probably go find yourself a book.

Let’s all give a nice ovation to the millennials out there who made this report possible by reading their Potter collections every year. *stands and waits for others to join in*

*sits back down awkwardly*

I’d like to know what you think of this finding. What do you think of millennials reading more than older Americans?

And oh by the way, this report is strictly talking books. I know some of  you had it in your head that they must have counted reading on social media or some other absurdity. So again, HA!

You can read about the report here.