Harper Lee has no one Looking out for her

Ugh.

I know y’all have likely read all about the mysteriousness of Go Set a Watchman. No, I’m not talking about the book itself. I’m talking about how it came to be found and published. There are plenty of details that just make you raise your eyebrows. But there’s more to it than what you’ve read.

Yesterday I was reading some articles in my CNN app and I came across one about Harper Lee. The title of the article was something about her being a four book author. Before I start criticizing everyone involved, let me just say that I know this happens with prominent writers. Short stories, poems, and books always seem to be popping up once they’re dead. I get that. Once they’re gone there’s someone else in control of everything and money motivates people to do just about anything. I get it.

But what’s happening now is blatantly disrespectful to Harper Lee. I’ve read numerous times now that when Go Set a Watchman was allegedly found, there was another unpublished manuscript. AND that there may be another manuscript floating around out there and only a few people know about. I don’t even doubt that these things may be true. Because Harper Lee likely didn’t just stop writing once she became an award-winning author. I’m sure there are unpublished stories out there. But right now she has no control over what people are doing around her and that’s just sad.

I realize that there are worse things happening to people all the time, but how would you feel if you had people going through all of your affairs and being able to do very little about it? You wouldn’t like it, and my guess is that Harper Lee is no different if she understands what’s happened. I don’t care if she has 15 books out there and the true next great American novel, Harper Lee deserves some respect just like we all do. And right now she’s just not getting it from those around her.

What do you think about unpublished manuscripts suddenly being “found” only after Lee’s sister (and lawyer) has died?


On this day in 2014 I published Kindle Unlimited Hmm….

 

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Go Set a Watchman is Finally Here

I remember the day earlier this year when it was announced that a new book would be forthcoming from Harper Lee. I remember because I basically broke the news to my readers. I saw a tweet that morning and posted on here shortly thereafter. But I also remember there being controversy surrounding this new book immediately.

How was it ACTUALLY discovered? Could Harper Lee even sign off on its publication at her age and mental state? How does this book relate to To Kill a Mockingbird? All these questions and so many more that have not really been answered in the months since that day.

Y’all know I don’t read book reviews. I don’t like them. I’m not interested in them. And I don’t typically care what any other person thinks about particular books. But I’ve made an exception to my own rule several times in recent days. I’ve wanted to see what professional reviewers were thinking of Lee’s new book. I imagine many of you have done the same. I’ll share all of my thoughts with y’all once I read the book because I don’t want to alter your thoughts or expectations about it before you even get a chance to read it.

What are your expectations for Go Set a Watchman?


On this day in 2014 I published Take me to the Library.

 

Amazon’s 100 Books Everyone Should Read: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

I put off reading this book for a LONG time, but I finally got around to it. I won’t tell you if I enjoyed it or not because then you probably wouldn’t even watch the video. So, go ahead and watch and we can chat about it.


On this day in 2014 I published Books and Judging Them by Their Covers.

 

Cool Dads in Literature

I don’t know what the rest of the world is doing today, but here in the US it’s Father’s Day. Or is it Fathers Day? Anyway, I figured I’d write a relevant post about it. So we’re talking dads in books. Let’s get to it.

Atticus Finch

If you don’t know, I’m reading To Kill a Mockingbird for my next video. I’ll be finished with it today once I’m home from work. Which means I’m not going to tell you anything about what I think of Atticus or the book here, except that I think he belongs on this list.

Alex Cross

He’s a detective in DC. Then moves on to the FBI. Then I think he goes back to detective work. I think. I’m only about halfway through the series and James Patterson releases them too fast for me to keep up with. But I’ve never read a single page of one of the Cross novels thinking that his family wasn’t his top priority. Reading about him and his family is just as entertaining as reading about the criminals he goes after.

Spenser

He’s not actually a father. But during the course of one of his books he takes a kid under his wing, and never forgets about him. And they develop this really interesting understanding between each other that I don’t think I’ve seen in other stories. Paul (the kid he takes under his wing) eventually knows when Spenser has something on his mind without needing to ask. He knows when to press him for information and when to back off. He knows as much about Spenser as Spenser is willing to let anyone know. Which is really cool because Spenser doesn’t go around giving out information about himself unnecessarily.

I think that’s it. I just discovered that most of the characters I read aren’t fathers. I guess having kids isn’t interesting enough to be in books. Who are some cool dads you’ve read about in literature?

And happy Father’s Day to all you papas out there.

Should Individual States Have a State Book?

If your state is the same as Texas, then you likely have various “___ of the state”. Like the state flower or the state motto or whatever it may be. My question to you is if you think states should have a state book?

My answer is sure. So long as the state book isn’t the Bible or some crap. I’m sure it’d be pretty easy to find an important book, fiction or not, set or about the state that would more qualify to be the state book of any state. For example, I could easily see To Kill a Mockingbird as the state book of Alabama. And if you go state by state you could easily find books for all 50 states.

An issue arises when lawmakers try to make a game of the whole thing. If the goal is to declare a book as the state book, then do it. If the goal is to draw attention to the state because it’s making a mockery of the process, then there really is no point.

What do you think? Should states have a state book? What do you think of states perhaps trying to name religious texts as the state book?


On this day in 2014 I published Deciding What to read Next.

 

 

Harper Lee to Publish Second Book This Year

Bush awards Presidential Medals of Freedom at White House

Photo: UPI

First things first, I haven’t read To Kill a Mockingbird. I know, I know. What have I been doing. But in my defense, I’ve never tried reading all the classics like a lot of other people. I just read what I read when I read it. Also, I just bought the book from Amazon. Ha. Because it is one of those books that I’ll read at some point. I doesn’t have to be next month or next year, but I’ll read it eventually.

But I do know just a little teeny tiny bit about the book. Every person who knows anything about books has heard of Scout and Atticus Finch. But honestly, besides knowing that there’s a legal aspect to the book, I know nothing. So don’t go ruining it for me! Seriously. That’s how you get blocked on WordPress.

So now to the present. Turns out that Harper Lee wrote another book way back in the 50s. Set in the same town as To Kill a Mockingbird and around some of the same characters. Most notably, Scout. This new book is called Go Set a Watchman. Based on what I’ve read from numerous articles, the story follows an older Scout as she returns home to visit her father. That’s about all that I can find at this point. But really, does it matter what the book is about? The book could be about dinosaurs taking over America and ruling the world and people would want to read it. Why? Harper Lee.

The book is set to be released on July 14 of this year. The first printing alone will be two million books. Will you be getting your hands on the new book? I might, if two things happen. First, if I get around to reading To Kill a Mockingbird prior to the release date. And second, if they decide to release it on Kindle. Since we all know how long it took for her first book to make it to eBook format. And because I don’t buy hardcovers.

I’m off to start her first book! Kidding. It’s not here yet. There are dozens of articles noting the new book’s release, but here’s one from The New York Times.

The Top Ten Books of 2014…on Twitter

BookVibe has compiled a list of books most mentioned on Twitter in 2014. Might as well just get into the list because I’m sure you’re more interested in the ten books than any preceding comments I have.

10. Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger

I suppose it would be unwise to think that a list like this wouldn’t include some classics, right? I mean, don’t high school kids have to read this? Maybe?

9. 1984 – George Orwell

I don’t know if high schoolers are reading this, but I’m not particularly surprised by it.

8. Jurassic Park – Michael Crichton

Hey. This is a definite surprise to me. It’s obvious that this made the list because of the new movie coming out next summer, but it is still nice to see people talking about it (even though we’re coming up on movie four and there are only two books.) But I read this in high school and then read the second one. Enjoyed both.

7. Eleanor and Park – Rainbow Rowell

Haven’t read this one, but I know it’s popular. My only question is if her real name is really Rainbow. And I actually know the titles of all of her books even though I haven’t read any of them. That’s cool.

6. Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn

When a book is adapted into a major movie that immediately gets some awards buzz going, well it’s hard to imagine a world in which Twitter isn’t right on board with that. Still haven’t read this, though I’m about 90 percent sure I know what happens. Eh.

5. Hannibal – Thomans Harris

Okay.

4. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

Obviously an American classic, but wasn’t this book just released as an e-book for the first time this year? Maybe that helped?

3. Looking for Alaska – John Green

I would have to go back and take a look at my banned books post, but I think this made the list. Cause I know it was published a few years ago and I figured that two of his other books would make this list over this one. Hm. What do I know?

2. A Game of Thrones – George R. R. Martin

There is absolutely nothing for me to say about this. Who wouldn’t expect this?

1. The Fault in Our Stars – John Green

Well it sure looks like John Green is right at the top of the literary world at the moment. Heck, this is the only book on the list I read in 2014. And he has another movie coming out next June. And is there anyone out there who doesn’t think his other works will be adapted at some point? Doubt it. I still would just like to mention that I have the same initials as John Green. Cause that somehow matters. This book actually had more than double the mentions on Twitter as the second book on the list. Sheesh.

So that’s it! The top ten books of 2014 on Twitter. Any surprises?